by Anchal Agarwal and Teresa Döring

Graffito on a wall, showing a soldier with his back turned towards the viewer and his hands in the air. A little girl is performing a body search on the soldier, making the picture a subversion of usual expectations.
Graffito on a wall, showing a soldier with his back turned towards the viewer and his hands in the air. A little girl is performing a body search on the soldier, making the picture a subversion of usual expectations.
Photo by Dan Meyers on Unsplash

Who do we talk about when we speak up for the civilians in Israel, in Gaza, and elsewhere? When media outlets around the world cover atrocities committed against Palestinians by Israel, they almost exclusively focus on women and particularly children. Little empathy is extended towards male Palestinians because they do not tend to be considered “innocent” and worthy of civilian protection. But this division of who gets to be a civilian is dangerous — and male Palestinian lives and human rights matter.

And because Twitter, for all its pitfalls, can be great in condensing…


By Anchal Agarwal and Teresa Döring

Israel and Palestine reached a ceasefire agreement on May 20, 2021, after eleven days of violence and destruction. More than 200 people were killed in Gaza, including several children. The violence led to the displacement and migration of thousands of Palestinians, forcing them to flee their homeland and seeking refugee status in neighbouring countries. Clashes were severe and intense and the bombs specifically targeted civilian infrastructure in the Gaza region. However, violence against Palestinians and their displacement is not a new phenomenon. The displacement of Palestinians can be traced back to several decades, especially…


by Anchal Agarwal

Before we delve into the article for this week, We at the Humans of Human Rights condemn the oppression, violence and disenfranchisement against Palestinians which has been going on for decades and is reaching new heights today. To shed some light on the issue, we would be covering different aspects of ethnic cleansing and settler colonialism with regards to Israel and Palestine. If you have some suggestions or resources to share, kindly use the comments section.

Gayatri Spivak in ‘Can the subaltern speak?’ reflects on the weaponisation of women’s rights between the coloniser and the colonised as…


by Teresa Döring

Bengali poet Rabindranath Tagore visits Japan, 1916. He is seen in the foreground, behind him there are other men, two facing the camera.
Bengali poet Rabindranath Tagore visits Japan, 1916. He is seen in the foreground, behind him there are other men, two facing the camera.
Bengali poet Rabindranath Tagore visits Japan, 1916. Image 1.

This week, let me take you on an excursion into the complex relations of inter-Asian anti-imperialist movements in the early 20th century — and please bear with me, because this historical approach is not only interesting, but also highly relevant to protests and anti-authoritarian struggles we see today.

Let’s set the scene: in 1946, the Tokyo War Crimes Tribunal convenes to try the leaders of the defeated Japanese Empire for crimes against peace, war crimes, and crimes against humanity. …


by Anchal Agarwal

In this article, find an overview of femicide and how the issue is reported all over the media.

What is Femicide?

Femicide is the killing of women and girls because of their gender. World Health Organization defines femicide “to involve intentional murder of women because they are women, but broader definitions include any killings or girls” [viii]. The definition was later expanded to “the misogynistic killing of women by men”. Not much research has been done yet, but femicide often involves an intimate partner/family member in the murder. Femicide is an extreme and ultimate form of violence against women and…


by Teresa Döring

In 2019, the criminal case against Kristina Hänel, a medical practitioner who published the fact that her clinic performs abortion on her website, re-fuelled a debate on abortion in Germany. Her website violated the “ban on advertisement” regarding abortion.[i] As a result, a new subparagraph was added to section 219a of the German Criminal Code.[ii] It is the newest instalment of a centuries-long public, political, and judicial discussion on abortion law in Germany.

But wait, you may ask. The German Criminal Code? Are abortions not legally accessible in Germany?

A Brief History of Abortion Law in Germany

As per law, abortion (unless medically necessary or…

Humans of Human Rights

We are Anchal and Teresa, LSE human rights and politics graduates who are passionate about human rights all over the world. We are looking to educate and share.

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